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Digital Nomad vs. Remote Worker

Digital Nomad vs. Remote Worker

By Leslie Radford

The year 2020 has brought on some untraditional work practices. Many people have become remote workers. Some are exploring being a digital nomad. But what’s the difference and which is right for you?

To start, a digital nomad is a remote worker, but a remote worker is not necessarily a digital nomad. However, both are digital – working through the internet – from a remote location.

digital nomad
digital nomad

Remote Worker

According to Global Workplace Analytics telecommuting statistics 2018, there were 4.3 million remote workers in the USA, which makes up 3.2% of the entire workforce.

The typical remote worker may be a freelancer, independent business owner, or work on a virtually distributed team. Remote workers tend to be stationary and mostly work from their home offices, co-working spaces, or coffee shops in the locale of their company.

Things people love about the remote working lifestyle:

  • More family time
  • Productivity increases due to fewer office-related distractions
  • Reduced transportation costs, vehicle depreciation, maintenance, and wear and tear on the vehicle
  • Career opportunities open up to other areas of the world

Drawbacks of the remote working lifestyle:

  • Loneliness can be an issue for those used to having co-workers around
  • Communicating with virtual teams can be difficult to manage for some
  • Non-work distractions (cleaning house, watching TV, etc.)

 

Digital Nomad

A digital nomad is a type of remote worker who travels while doing their jobs remotely. They are not bound to a specific time or location to work. Think of the as a modern-day gypsy.

Things people love about being a Digital Nomad:

  • Enjoy the flexibility to work wherever they want in the world
  • Work when you want
  • Travel freely
  • No daily commutes or schedules

Drawbacks of the Digital Nomad lifestyle:

  • May miss the comforts of home that remote workers enjoy
  • At times, Wi-Fi can be difficult to obtain in some locations
  • Traveling to different time zones can present challenges for some clients
  • Acquiring new business and networking can also be challenging

Both work styles have benefits and drawbacks. It really depends on what’s more important to the individual.

How to Tailor Your Resume for Remote Work

How to Tailor Your Resume for Remote Work

How to Tailor Your Resume for Remote Work

By Leslie Radford

 

Remote work is on the rise, especially these days. In 2020 (before the arrival of COVID-19) there were already 7 million people working remotely in the U.S.

Here’s what you need to design your resume for working remotely:

resume

 

Emphasize Remote Work in Your Career Objective

In the section of your resume that you’d normally put your objective, highlight your accomplishments and briefly discuss why remote work helped you achieve them. If you want a remote role but don’t have that work experience, you should be explicit about your desire to work remotely. It’s important to make it clear in your application, cover letter, and resume that you’re seeking a remote opportunity.

 

Describe Your Home Office and Why It Works

Many employers may feel remote working has a downturn in productivity and effectiveness. To alleviate their potential concerns, it can be helpful to describe your home/remote office and explain why it boosts your productivity. Be clear about the details of how your process works.

 

Show It in the Skills Section

Tell your potential employer how you can communicate with your teammates while away from the office. List the tools you’ve used like Slack, Zoom, Asana, etc. If the company you’re interviewing with uses the same tools, it’ll likely put you in favor with them. Show how good you are at time management. Quantify how responsible you are and the size and scope of projects you’ve been in charge of. You’ll need to be comfortable with video conferencing, messaging, and using team and project management tools. Focus on your skills, stats, and achievements instead of duties. Ultimately your potential employer wants to see what you’re capable of and what impact you’ve had. Show these off with quantitative examples (numbers, percentages, and dollar amounts) within your work experience if you want to stand out.

 

Let Them Get to Know You Online

Include your social profiles (when appropriate) and personal website. Since you are not location bound, remove your address, it becomes irrelevant. If you feel the need to put something in its place, you can simply state “remote” or “location independent.” If you want to work online it’s critical that you have an online presence.

 

Use Relevant Keywords for Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS).

A lot of remote companies will use something called an applicant tracking system. The ATS will automatically filter applications on a set of criteria before it even gets in front of a human. Use keywords in your industry to get noticed.

 

What Employers Want to Know

Many employers and remote employees might consider remote work a skill in itself. It takes a lot of focus, discipline, and strong communication to be an efficient and effective remote worker. Employers want to know you’re equipped to work from home.

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